#materialscience

Research, development and commercial applications of advanced flexible materials.

Recent Articles

Moisture Management in Wound Care: Highlighting MVTR in Transparent Film Dressings

In Brief

A wound can be described or defined in many ways: by its source, anatomical location and appearance, whether acute or chronic, by presenting symptoms, and by the method of closure. In fact, all of these descriptions serve a critical purpose in the assessment and appropriate treatment and management of the wound. Successful wound management seeks symptom resolution and, if viable, complete healing. Managing skin wound care involves supporting the damaged tissue by promoting restoration through the formation of connective tissue and re-growth of the epithelium. Optimum conditions for wound healing involve creating a desirable micro-environment in which an ideal moisture content is one of the most important factors.

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Flexible Materials Preferred in Wound Care & Closure

In Brief

In wound care management, the primary objective is complete healing. This is attained through thoughtful planning of patient care for reducing the loss of necessary fluids from the wound, accelerating wound healing, and minimizing pain and infection.

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Non-Absorbable Sutures, explained

In Brief

Suturing is one of the most critical factors in a healthy recovery for surgery patients. Proper suturing is crucial for healing, infection prevention and in minimizing scarring.

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What makes a Material "Medical Grade"?

In Brief

Materials used in the healthcare and medical setting must often carry the title "medical grade." But what defines a material as "medical grade"? Biocompatibility refers to "the ability of a material to perform with an appropriate host response in a specific application" (William's definition), and can be measured in different ways, depending on the context of the medical device. Because they come in contact with the human body, materials are tested for biocompatibility and safety in order to receive the "medical grade" designation.

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Auxetic Materials Offer New Options in the Medical and Life Sciences Fields

In Brief

Auxetic materials are characterized by becoming thicker perpendicular to the applied force when stretched. This is caused by the way their particular internal structure is designed to deform and exhibit a negative Poisson's ratio. Scientists hope to exploit this effect to create new products, including body armor, joint replacements, stretchable electronics, electronic skin and more. 

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