#materialscience

Research, development and commercial applications of advanced flexible materials.

Recent Articles

What's New With Nonwovens in the Medical Industry?

In Brief

The utilization of nonwoven fabrics in the medical field has outpaced woven materials in recent years. Even when traced back to their rapid adoption during WWII, nonwovens were proven to be superior products in terms of adaptability, disposability, cost, and effectiveness. Manufacturing technology improved in the following decades until current-day use of nonwovens has placed them in a position to dominate the medical textile industry.

Read More
 0

Anatomy of a Lateral Flow Test Strip

In Brief

Lateral flow test strips are simple, easy to use devices that can detect the presence or absence of a target analyte (chemical or substance) in a specimen provided by a patient. These tests are typically used at point of care (medical office), at home, or in the laboratory. They are valued for being low-cost, simple, rapid and portable.

Read More
 0

Technical Primer - Nonwovens


Abstract

Nonwoven fabrics have a long history. Even nature has examples of nonwoven fabrics: silk cocoons and spider webs, for example. Sumerians have been described as creating felt using wool as early as 4000 BC. The modern nonwovens industry, however, arose in the 1920s and 1930s. In 1938, artificial leather was created and sold for the first time. 1942 saw the introduction of the term “nonwoven fabric” and its wide use across the industry. By 1947, disposable diapers had been produced using nonwoven technology.

 

Read More
 0

Polymer Basics for Polyvinyl Chloride


Abstract

Polyvinyl chloride is the most widely used plastic material in medical applications. It has a low cost, is easy to process, and can be tailored to yield the desired properties. Often times PVC by itself is not very useful, however heat stabilizers, plasticizers, and various polymers can be added so that the material gains a diverse range of properties from rigid to flexible. Polyvinyl chloride is used in different medical applications such as dialysis bags, surgical drapes, blister packaging, and oxygen face masks.
 
Read More
 0

Polymer Basics for Polyurethane


Abstract

Polyurethanes are polymers made up of long chains, with the base monomer being composed of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen. There are various types of polyurethanes, with each individual type yielding different properties. Polyurethanes may come in the form of rigid or flexible foams, adhesives, coatings, or as a thermoplastic polyurethane.  Overall, polyurethanes have excellent toughness, clarity, low-temperature flexibility, and are biocompatible. Polyurethanes are used in applications such as blood bags, pacemaker leads, body and limb prosthesis, and acetabular cups.
 
Read More
 0