#materialscience

Research, development and commercial applications of advanced flexible materials.

Brianna Sporbert

Brianna Sporbert is the Director of Sourcebook™ Engineering at Boyd Technologies and the principle trainer for Sourcebook™ Tutorials. Brianna is a Biomedical Engineer with a degree from Western New England University. Prior to joining Boyd Technologies she worked in research, cell culture and clinical laboratory settings at Nuclea Biotechnologies, and FloDesign Sonics. Brianna manages the development, training, and engineering support efforts for the Sourcebook™ material sourcing platform. She is an avid figure skater and coach.

Recent Articles

Recent Posts

Polymer Basics for Acrylics


Abstract

Acrylic plastic is a family of synthetic, man-made materials that contain a derivative of acrylic acid. Acrylic plastics are form-able, have exceptional weather-ability, and have optical clarity. Acrylics have the highest transmittance of light, being that their total white light transmittance is 92%. While acrylic plastics have many advantages, they are also more expensive than glass and will melt when exposed to a direct flame. There are different types of acrylics, and one of the most commonly used is Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA). Acrylic plastics can be found in medical devices such as drip chambers, diagnostics, labware, and cuvettes.
 
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Polymer Basics for Acrylate Polymers


Abstract

Acrylates are the salts and esters of acrylic acid. The acrylates readily form clear plastics due to a double carbon bond, directly attached to the carbonyl carbon, within their chemical structure. These plastics possess extremely high optical clarity, exceptional weatherability, good chemical resistance, and are available in biocompatible grades. In the medical industry acrylates are used in cuvettes, tubing, and blood plasma separators.
 
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Polymer Basics for Acetals


Abstract

Acetals are high molecular weight, highly crystalline plastics. They are produced by the polymerization of formaldehyde or its derivatives. They are tough, have a high stiffness, and a low coefficient of friction. Acetals are used in the medical applications of blood filtration materials, luer caps, and inhaler components.
 
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Sterilization Compatibility for Natural Polymers


Abstract

The FDA regulates four critical forms of sterilization: autoclave, dry heat, ethylene oxide, and irradiation. Irradiation includes both gamma ray and electron beam methods.

 

The effectiveness and suitability of these methods depends on the specific properties of each material being sterilized. Download a quick reference guide for the compatibility of these methods with natural polymers.


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Sterilization Compatibility for Synthetic Polymers


Abstract

The FDA regulates four critical forms of sterilization: autoclave, dry heat, ethylene oxide, and irradiation. Irradiation includes both gamma ray and electron beam methods.

 

The effectiveness and suitability of these methods depends on the specific properties of each material being sterilized. Download a quick reference guide for the compatibility of these methods with synthetic polymers.


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