#materialscience

Research, development and commercial applications of advanced flexible materials.

Recent Articles

Non-Absorbable Sutures, explained

In Brief

Suturing is one of the most critical factors in a healthy recovery for surgery patients. Proper suturing is crucial for healing, infection prevention and in minimizing scarring.

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Advances in Exoskeletal Materials

In Brief

Developments in prostheses and robot technology have advanced rapidly, leading to the manufacture of devices known as 'exoskeletons.' These rigid devices, usually constructed with plastic and metal, act as an external skeleton, providing support and mobility to someone with decreased muscle tone or activity. While these devices provide exciting capabilities to the wearer, they are inherently heavy and inflexible.

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Thin Silicone Membranes for Medical Devices and Laboratory Products

 

In Brief 

Thin silicone membranes are used in medical devices and laboratory products such as catheters, valves, thin film parts, and gaskets. These highly-permeable polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membranes provide a barrier to liquids and a permeable path to gaseous elements and compounds.

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The Rise of Single-use Bioreactors: Why make the Switch?

In Brief

The single-use bioreactor market generated $202.5 million last year and researchers estimate it will see another 18.4 percent increase in 2019, reaching $470.9 million. Sixty-six percent of pharmaceutical companies are now preferring this disposable product. What are the advantages of single-use bioreactor bags?

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What makes a Material "Medical Grade"?

In Brief

Materials used in the healthcare and medical setting must often carry the title "medical grade." But what defines a material as "medical grade"? Biocompatibility refers to "the ability of a material to perform with an appropriate host response in a specific application" (William's definition), and can be measured in different ways, depending on the context of the medical device. Because they come in contact with the human body, materials are tested for biocompatibility and safety in order to receive the "medical grade" designation.

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